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#180281
Hello , everyone! Recently I've bought the arduino board with the arduino breadboard syb 46 https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B4BDjp ... sp=sharing.


The problem is I don't understand how to use it. I can't understand the scheme of this model of breadboard, where is plus and minus, where is ground , etc. I've already watched a lot videos about arduino breadboards on youtube but I found no videos about this arduino breadboard model :( I 'm asking about help, because the absence of needed information very frustrates me :( so I can't begin to work on arduino :(

Thanks in advance!
#180318
It seems to me that you're missing the fact that the commonly used breadboards have two power rails . For example, in the post you shared me we can see a breadboard with two power rails

https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B4BDjp ... sp=sharing

But my breadboard has just one power rail.

https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B4BDjp ... sp=sharing

That confuses me extremely :(
#180319
vyacheslav_serkov wrote:It seems to me that you're missing the fact that the commonly used breadboards have two power rails . For example, in the post you shared me we can see a breadboard with two power rails

https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B4BDjp ... sp=sharing
That board has 4 rails, 2 on each side.
But my breadboard has just one power rail.

https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B4BDjp ... sp=sharing

That confuses me extremely :(
That board has 2 rails, one on each side.

Is that so hard to figure out
#180322
Secondly, why would you buy a board that confuses you?
#180332
vyacheslav_serkov wrote:It seems to me that you're missing the fact that the commonly used breadboards have two power rails . For example, in the post you shared me we can see a breadboard with two power rails

But my breadboard has just one power rail.

That confuses me extremely :(
Well it still works the same as the other one, just with less access to it's "power" rails. Given that a lot of circuits only use 1 supply voltage and ground, it's not that limiting. But if you have a circuit that needs multiple voltages either get a BB with multiple rails or dedicate an unused row (or 2) to be a power "rail". Then the wires just go to a different physical location.